California Legislature Passes AB 282 Legalizing Family Members Encouraging Assisted Suicide

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The California Senate rushed AB 282 through on the first day that the legislature returned from recess. The bill legalizes aiding, advising, or encouraging assisted suicide. The bill was passed yesterday afternoon. See votes here.

Lifenews writes that the law “grants complete legal immunity to anyone who wants to facilitate the death of someone who is defined as “terminally ill” under California’s assisted suicide law. The law defines “terminal” as a condition expected to lead to death within six months if left untreated. This means diabetes, high blood pressure, treatable conditions—even an infection—could be considered “terminal.””

This new California law says that it is legal to advise, encourage, or aid someone who is having suicidal thoughts to go through with them, if they are declared to be terminally ill by doctors.

Life Legal challenged California’s Assisted Suicide law and this bill was introduced as a result. Lifenews reports that “California’s assisted suicide law allows “interested” witnesses, which include beneficiaries, to sign a person’s request for assisted suicide drugs. The new law—assisted suicide on steroids—allows an individual to aid, advise, and encourage a person to commit suicide—AND sign off on the method of suicide—while financially benefitting from the person’s death. And it’s all legal now.”

California’s updated assisted suicide law is dangerous. It is unethical. It should never be legal to allow family members to sign off on their family member’s death when doing so would mean a financial profit for them.

(4) Comments

  1. My uncle and others I know who died of prostate cancer that went to the bone ended up at home or in hospitals in immense, horrific pain for weeks before dying. No drug can stop pain when cancer is in the bone. I would have gladly brought them something to terminate their life if they felt that they wanted it (but I would NEVER try to encourage them to do it…just make it available so they could use it if things got so bad that they couldn’t take it anymore and had to just lay there in extreme, unrelenting pain till they died..) I myself would want the same for me. I think the bill the politicians created makes it very easy….way to easy….for someone to be forced to be injected with a drug to kill them because a relative or someone else wanted to inherit something from them or not want to have to care for them or for some other bad reason. This bill makes murder easy. A helpless person in bed who can’t help him/ her self even to get up to go to the bathroom….laying there helpless…could be killed against their will with no witnesses there…and no way to prove that it was murder. There are NO PROTECTIONS in this bill. I worked taking care of people in hospice settings for many years….and even without this bill there isn’t enough protection for people. Another issue I see which I never hear people being concerned about is that if a terminally ill person signed a paper to get an injection to end their life and then died without using the death causing injection….anyone (relative, friend, enemy, etc.) could claim that the terminally ill person killed him/herself and take that unused deadly full needle and use it on someone else who isn’t terminally ill…they could use it for murder. There is no way that you could prevent that killer needle from being taken from the terminally ill person and use it to kill someone else. There is no doctor or anyone who is in charge or making sure that unused deadly needles would not be taken and used for other purposes. Maybe the politicians who passed this bill will find out what a mess they made if someone takes a deadly needle from a person in hospice who didn’t use theirs and uses it instead to terminate the lives of politicians they disagree with. Then maybe they will re-think the idea that it is safe to allow using these medications without a doctor or some one with authority (government agency?) in charge of someone using and disposing of the deadly needle and if the ill person decided not to use the deadly needle then the person with authority could dispose of it or put it back from where it came from.

    Reply
    • I can relate to what you are saying – it is difficult to endure pain. However, I still think it is wrong to assist in taking someone’s life.

      Reply
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